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The Headteacher's Blog

Introduction

Welcome to Lydgate Junior School.

We aim to ensure that all children receive a high quality, enjoyable and exciting education.

We feel that our school is a true reflection of the community we serve. Lydgate children are well motivated and come from a range of social and cultural backgrounds. Within the school community we appreciate the richness of experience that the children bring to school. This enhances the learning experiences of everyone and it also gives all pupils the opportunity to develop respect and tolerance for each other by working and playing together. We want your child's time at Lydgate to be memorable for the right reasons - that is, a happy, fulfilling and successful period of his/her childhood.

Yours sincerely,
Stuart Jones

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Introduction

Welcome to Year 3!

The Y3 teachers are Mrs Dutton & Mrs de Brouwer (3D/deB), Mrs Holden (3SH), Mrs Noble & Miss Roberts (3N/R) and Miss Wall (3AW). We have three Teaching Assistants who work within the team: Mrs Allen, Mrs Dawes and Mr Gartrell.

We will use this blog to keep you up-to-date with all the exciting things that we do in Year 3, share some of the things that the children learn and show you some of their fantastic work. We hope you enjoy reading it!

The Y3 team.


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Introduction

Welcome to the Y4 blog. 

The Y4 team consists of the following teachers: Mrs Purdom in Y4JP, Mrs Smith and Mrs Smith (yes, that's right) in Y4SS, Mrs Wymer in Y4CW and Ms Reasbeck and Mrs Drury in Y4RD. The children are also supported by our teaching assistants: Mrs Proctor, Mrs Cooper, Mrs Hornsey, Mr Jenkinson and Mrs Wolff. We have help from Mrs Farrell, Miss Lee and Mrs Grimsley too and some of the children are lucky enough to spend time in The Hub with Mrs Allen. What a team!


We know that the question children are mostly asked when they arrive home is 'What did you do today?' The response is often 'nothing'! Well, here is where you can find out what 'nothing' looks like. In our weekly blogs your children will share with you what they have been getting up to and show some of the wonderful work they have been doing. Check in each weekend for our latest news.


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Introduction

Welcome to the Year 5 Blog page.

The Year 5 teaching team includes our class teachers, Mrs Loosley (5NL), Mrs Rougvie and Mrs Jones (5RJ), Mrs Webb and Mrs Ridsdale (5WR) and Miss Cunningham (5EC).  Many children are supported by Mrs Hill, Mr Swain and Ms Kania (the Year 5 Teaching Assistants) who work with children across the 4 classes. Our Year 5 teaching team aims to create a stimulating learning environment that is safe, happy, exciting and challenging, where each pupil is encouraged to achieve their full potential.

As a parent or carer, you play a massively important role in your child's development and we'd love to work closely with you. Please feel free to make an appointment to see us if you want to discuss your child's attitude to learning, their progress, attainment or anything else that might be on your mind. We'd also love to hear from you if you have any skills that we could use to make our Year 5 curriculum even more exciting. Are you an avid reader, a talented sportsman, a budding artist, a mad scientist or a natural mathematician? Would you be willing to listen to children read on a regular basis? If so, please contact your child’s class teacher. Similarly, if you have a good idea, a resource, a 'contact' or any other way of supporting our learning in year 5, please let us know.

We are working very hard to ensure your child has a successful year 5, please help us with this by ensuring your child completes and returns any homework they are given each week. If there are any issues regarding homework or your child finds a particular piece of homework challenging, then please do not hesitate to come and speak to us. In order to help improve your child’s reading skills, increase their vocabulary and develop their comprehension skills, we also ask that you listen to your child read and ask them questions to ensure they have understood what they have read.

We look forward to keeping you up to date on the exciting things that we do in year 5 through our year group blog.


The Year 5 Team

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Introduction

We are the children in Y6 at Lydgate Junior School. There are 120 of us and our teachers are: Mrs Shaw and Mrs Watkinson (Y6S/W), Mr Bradshaw (until Mrs Parker returns) in Y6AP), Mrs Phillips (Y6CP) and Miss Norris (Y6HN). Also teaching in Year 6 is Miss Lee (Monday - Y6AP, Tuesday - Y6HN and Wednesday - Y6S/W) and Mrs Grimsley (Tuesday -Y6CP).We are also very lucky to be helped by Mrs Ainsworth and Mrs Biggs. We use this space to share all of the great things that are happening in our classrooms. Join us each week on our learning journey....

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06 Dec 2019

Coat and Hat Hooks

I overheard a conversation at the Office hatch a couple of weeks ago, and on reflection later I was embarrassed that a parent had felt it necessary to come and talk to school about the issue that was troubling them and their child.

Their son, they said, could not hang his coat in the cloakroom because his allocated hook was broken, had been broken for some time and, despite mentioning it, there was no sign that it would be replaced.

At first I was baffled that someone would raise what appeared to be a relatively insignificant matter in such a way - going to the trouble to come in to school to make representations. Then I got defensive and went through all my own complaints on the subject - how do hooks get broken? Why do bags get hung on what are 'coat and hat hooks'? why do bags have to be so big? can children not stand them up or put them under the bench as directed? And finally I got to the place where I accepted that the child was frustrated as much as the parent. Their offer to come in themselves with drill and screwdriver to do the job should be going too far, but I did get the point: for this child this was what mattered.

We do have our defenses, of course. It is children's actions that bend and break hooks. We replace 100 plus each year. The cloakrooms, all four of them, in the main building have been reconfigured and the number of hooks has been increased in each. Each hook has two parts - one for coat, and one for hat (hence their real title as 'coat and hat hook'). We only have so much caretaker time and only so much cash to either buy resources or to buy services. There are other, more pressing, priorities. Mobile classrooms are supposed to be temporary. Mobiles are not new, nor terribly solid, and fixing anything can be a challenge.

But once we accept that this is what matters to that child then we have to get on with the work.

So a new programme has started. The old, contiboard, planks and hooks have been removed, to be replaced by solid timber as in the main building. New double hooks (for coat and hat) have been fixed - some in technicolour - meaning there is a total fresh start.

We cannot make the space bigger (as cost prevents us extending what is, after all, supposed to be temporary) or because we need space in classrooms rather more than we need it in cloakrooms, so they will remain squashed. What I hope is that that pupil recognises that raising his issue incessantly until answered got things done. I hope his new hook is sound and does not get damaged. I also hope that each child recognises work done and uses the facility correctly. I may have mentioned this; they are coat and hat hooks, not coat, bag and instrument hooks - they are not designed for that bulk or that weight.

New hooks in a row (and already some bent out of original shape).

I was going to paste in a photo of a line of bent hooks - but here is the new set instead. (Clearly not a posed picture as you can tell from the drawstring PE bags in the shot!)

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18 Jan 2019

This week I have mostly been …

This week I have tried to share my professional experience and insight by responding to research inquiries and questionnaires. But it can get a bit silly…

I have been asked about staff ASD training and confidence (sound idea with practical potential).

I have been asked about my confidence in planning the teaching of reading (good idea to inform staff development plans)

I have been asked about mental health service development needs for Sheffield (vital, but seriously pessimistic)

I have been asked about proposed changes to Ofsted Inspection (relevant, obviously, but doubtful that my input will make any difference, and without the formal consultation actually being open)

I was asked about Brexit contingency planning and preparation (my response was as brief as our plan)

I was asked about LED light bulbs (seriously!)

School was asked three times about procurement practices (because they wouldn’t be fobbed off)

I am crucially aware of the research need for quality information that is honest and full, as the data we try to use often has gaping holes in it. Where there is a chance that research might be well-designed and well-intended and useful we try to participate. My wonderful colleagues responded in numbers to a student’s request around ASD provision; they saw the immediate relevance and wanted to help.

But Brexit planning and LED light bulbs can go sit over there.
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07 Dec 2018

Listen up at the back!

While we reserve the right to make the decisions (particularly because we are, ultimately, responsible for the outcomes of them), and want our professionality to be respected, we really do listen to the valuable opinion of ‘stakeholders’.

This week I met with a small but well-informed set of parents in a ‘round table discussion’ on school’s response to what is known as adverse weather. As a result of comments made by them, and in emails contributions, I will be changing the wording of some elements of our published scheme of working. They asked that I clarify authorisation of late arrival if a sibling’s school is opening later than us. So I will. And other points raised will be similarly explained.

I have been partly responsible for whipping up a little passion and idealism in our pupils, partly around School Council but also linked simply to them having a mind and speaking it. When one pupil decided to propose some environmentally-aware action she was not content to be told ‘no’ on the first request. She came back with a really coherent political and ethical argument. I admire the commitment and I have yielded to her request and told her (and her mum) how much I admire and respect her campaigning. School visitors will shortly see the outcome of her talking and talking to me until I agreed with her request.

Four Year 6 pupils have spent a good slice of each day’s playtimes with me (at their own choice) this week to discuss their request that they be allowed a ‘den’ to play in. They have not been put off but have responded positively and thoughtfully to every point I made, to every objection I raised. They ‘got’ the legitimacy of my issues and sensibly argued back, and conceded where it was obvious they had to. Five days later they are nearly there – I am just one sticking point away from conceding to their request (and possibly causing myself a lot of difficulty with colleagues and other pupils). They have moved me from a straight out ‘no’.

Colleagues have argued the case for staffing increases and supply cover. They are well-aware of financial pressures but critically aware of risks from under-staffing and the pressures on colleagues from the same. And so we have covered absences we previously haven’t, and are about to advertise to refill a vacancy we have run with for half a year.

Governors considered the normal range of issues at their committee meeting. While they recognise there are sensible and practical limits to what we can, they are still keen to continue to improve, and so small steps forward in site security will happen, and communication and challenge over school meal quality will continue.

The Local Authority, through the Schools Company ‘LearnSheffield’, offered us access to a website audit tool. This highlighted things we should improve to ensure full annual compliance and an up-to-date set of information. Reports, Policies, Strategy documents and links have been reviewed and improved as a result.

If we were rigid, unsympathetic and un-listening none of these changes might happen. We won’t promise to always agree with an opposing or even a novel view but we will continue to listen and consider.

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21 Sep 2018

Talk Talk

In an exercise on our training day a colleague asked about the development of an email policy.

In ‘Feedback’ some parents raised questions about communications between senior leaders and parents.

One stage of the response to both has been senior leadership-level discussion about the range, purpose, place, timeliness and effectiveness of the communications strategies we use.

This one week we have used telephone calls, home visits, a newsletter, direct personal email, booked meetings, drop-in meetings, informal conversations, focussed letters, ‘bump’ notes, the school website, being visible, the FOLA ‘End of Summer BBQ’, the front desk, and all our electronic and physical interfaces to share information and enhance contacts. We know we have not seen everyone and not shared everything, nor answered all the unspoken questions but we certainly have continued to ‘reach out’ and to be available.

Conversations have provided insight into cycle storage, private school admissions, school start times, lost property, before school activities, homework, accessibility, and a myriad of personal issues.

We are honestly happy to meet, listen and talk as much as we can, and we will continue to do so.

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09 Jun 2018

Is there a future for School Uniform?

In the week that saw parents in a small region of France (Provins) vote to introduce school uniform (against that nation’s norm), and when our Year 4 classes are debating hot topics (Y4S/D were arguing the points around uniform), I’m asking your opinion.

Our Uniform Policy was introduced some years ago after over-whelming support by the then parent body. As far as I know, that group has not been asked for a confirmation since. The Policy statement talks about that parent support; but today’s parents are not those same people. So what do you think today? Is uniform still right? Is what we ask for practical, reasonable, suitable, reasonably priced? Setting the right tone? Open for enough individual variation? Helpful for children with specific needs? Non-discriminatory?

There’s a Survey Monkey link at the bottom of this blog if you’d like to comment.

Uniform will be one of the topics for our ‘Round Table Discussions’ next year.

Currently we ask for:

Dark royal blue sweatshirt, cardigan or fleece.

White or blue shirt or polo shirt.

Black, navy or grey trousers. Plain black, navy or grey jeans with no may be worn.

Headscarves should be blue, black or white.

Tights should be black, plain grey, navy or a neutral colour.

Sensible shoes, boots or trainers.

For those children who wish to wear something lighter in the summer months:

Gingham dress in blue & white, red & white or yellow & white.

Black, navy, grey or blue shorts (from above the ankle to just above the knee).

Sandals or crocs.

Jewellery – only watches and sleeper/stud earrings are allowed.

We have around 99% engagement / agreement, but we are having to be tight on this currently with some less-willing or less-aware pupils.

Questions:

Keep the uniform as it is?

Relax the uniform to ‘optional’?

Do away with a uniform totally?

Go for a standout colour instead of a plain-old blue?

Introduce a more formal code, such as blazers and shirt and tie?

Have four separate colours for PE kit, one for each Team?

Just click the link to take part:

https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/RJY9FSV

 

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