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The Headteacher's Blog

Introduction

Welcome to Lydgate Junior School.

We aim to ensure that all children receive a high quality, enjoyable and exciting education.

We feel that our school is a true reflection of the community we serve. Lydgate children are well motivated and come from a range of social and cultural backgrounds. Within the school community we appreciate the richness of experience that the children bring to school. This enhances the learning experiences of everyone and it also gives all pupils the opportunity to develop respect and tolerance for each other by working and playing together. We want your child's time at Lydgate to be memorable for the right reasons - that is, a happy, fulfilling and successful period of his/her childhood.

Yours sincerely,
Stuart Jones

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Introduction

Welcome to Year 3!

The Y3 Team includes Mrs Dutton & Mrs de Brouwer (3D/deB), Miss Cunningham (3EC), Mrs Webb & Mrs Watkinson (3W/W) and Miss Roberts & Mrs Noble (3AR). We have three Teaching Assistants who work with small groups and help across the four classes: Mrs Dale, Ms Kania and Mr Swain. Mrs Proctor, one of the School Governors, also helps out in all four classes.

We will use this blog to keep you up-to-date with all the exciting things that we do in Year 3, share some of the things that the children learn and show you some of their fantastic work. We hope you enjoy reading it!

The Y3 team.

 

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Introduction

Welcome to the Y4 blog. We know that the question that children are mostly asked as they leave school is 'What did you do today?' The response is often 'nothing'! Well, here is where you can find what 'nothing' looks like. In our weekly blogs we will share with you what your children have been getting up to and all of the wonderful work that they have been doing. The Y4 team consists of the following teachers: Mrs Shaw and Mrs Drury in Y4S/D, Mrs Smith and Mrs Smith (this is not a typo!) in Y4S/S, Miss Norris in Y4HN and Miss Wall in Y4AW. The children are supported by our teaching assistants too, including Mrs Biggs, Mr Jenkinson and Mrs Tandy. We also have help from Miss Lee, Mrs Cooper, Mrs Flynn and Mrs Wolff. Some of the children are lucky enough to spend time in The Hub too with Mrs Tandy. What a team!

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Introduction

Welcome to the Year 5 Blog page.

The Year 5 teaching team includes our class teachers, Mrs Parker (5AP), Mrs Rougvie and Mrs Jones (5RJ), Miss Reasbeck and Mrs Ridsdale (5RR) and Mrs Holden (5SH). . Many children are supported by Mrs Hill and Mrs Allen (the Year 5Teaching Assistants) who work with children across the 4 classes. Our Year 5 teaching team aims to create a stimulating learning environment that is safe, happy, exciting and challenging, where each pupil is encouraged to achieve their full potential.

As a parent or carer, you play a massively important role in your child's development and we'd love to work closely with you. Please feel free to make an appointment to see us if you want to discuss your child's attitude to learning, their progress, attainment or anything else that might be on your mind. We'd also love to hear from you if you have any skills that we could use to make our Year 5 curriculum even more exciting. Are you an avid reader, a talented sportsman, a budding artist, a mad scientist or a natural mathematician? Would you be willing to listen to children read on a regular basis? If so, please contact your child’s class teacher. Similarly, if you have a good idea, a resource, a 'contact' or any other way of supporting our learning in year 5, please let us know.

We are working very hard to ensure your child has a successful year 5, please help us with this by ensuring your child completes and returns any homework they are given each week. If there are any issues regarding homework or your child finds a particular piece of homework challenging, then please do not hesitate to come and speak to us. In order to help improve your child’s reading skills, increase their vocabulary and develop their comprehension skills, we also ask that you listen to your child read and ask them questions to ensure they have understood what they have read.

We look forward to keeping you up to date on the exciting things that we do in year 5 through our year group blog.


The Year 5 Team

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Introduction

We are the children in Y6 at Lydgate Junior School. There are 120 of us and our teachers are: Mrs Purdom, Mrs Phillips, Mrs Loosley and Mrs Wymer. Our Monday and Thursday morning teachers are Mrs Farrell, Miss Lee and Mr Jones.We are also very lucky to be helped by Mrs Ainsworth, Mrs Cooper, Mr Jenkinson, Mrs Biggs and Mrs Dawes. We use this space to share all of the great things that are happening in our classrooms. Join us each week on our learning journey....

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09 Feb 2018

Quick! Hide that fruit and veg

So a study published this week in the BMJ (British Medical Journal) shows that Primary Schools’ efforts to help cut obesity, and improve physical activity, don’t work.

More than 600 primary school pupils in the West Midlands took part in a 12-month anti-obesity programme.

But the study found no improvements in the children's diet or activity levels.

This was despite the involvement of the local Premier League football team, cooking classes and clubs, 30 minutes of exercise each school day, and advertising local family exercise.

My observation in school is that some children simply do not take up what is on offer:

I counted the numbers of children who took no fruit, vegetable or salad from the range on offer with the regular school meal over the last two days. Logic would suggest that, in our affluent, middle class, well-educated, advantaged area, our pupils would be familiar with all that we have on offer and keen to sample green beans, sweetcorn, peas, apples, pears, baked beans, melon, tomatoes, cucumber, salad leaves, couscous and so on. Yesterday one half of all the meal takers had no fruit, vegetable or salad on their plate. Chilli and rice, wraps, jacket potato, but no veg, fruit or salad. Today, with the most popular menu of the week, over one third had none of the three (but only if I count baked beans as a vegetable). Fish, chips, and sometimes just chips, no veg, fruit, salad and sometimes no pudding.

We have trained pupils to act as Playground Playmakers. They organise and run games and activities on the top playground every day. They are keen – they volunteered for the role, and always turn up. What is striking is how few children join in the games they arrange. Today there were often no more than five children participating, out of the 342 in school!

Ask a child who does participate and what you find is that it is just one of the many things that they do each week – tomorrow’s cross country runners will then be off to skate, swim or dance, for example. To coin a phrase, ‘Those who do, do. Those who don’t, won’t’. It could be a dispiriting and difficult hill to climb, but we find ways to address the issues.

What the recipe for the menu does is slide in under-cover fruit and vegetable. The chilli had carrot and tomato, the wraps had peppers. The sponge included apple puree in the recipe, and the chocolate crunch bar had orange in the blend. If we can just make sure that they do eat what they choose to take …

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03 Jan 2018

Time to 'Ban the Snacks'?

Is a simple outright ban on ALL playtime snacking the only answer to unsuitable, sugar-loaded, snacking?

I wrote about my concerns around snacking at school back in June and July 2017, (see Blog posts: http://www.lydgatejunior.co.uk/the-headteachers-blog/a-weighty-issue  and http://www.lydgatejunior.co.uk/the-headteachers-blog/not-a-healthy-snack  ) and about food waste in November 2017 (http://www.lydgatejunior.co.uk/the-headteachers-blog/love-food-hate-waste ).

This week we have seen announcements from Public Health England encouraging parents to limit children’s snacks to 100 calories and to no more than two a day. (https://www.gov.uk/government/news/phe-launches-change4life-campaign-around-childrens-snacking )

One third of Primary School aged children are over-weight or obese. 28% of pupils in our school are over-weight or obese, from Year 6 height and weight measurements by Health professionals. Schools should safeguard their pupils' health and well-being, and so this IS an issue for schools to take up. We could clearly do more than we already have in place, even though this includes:

  • All school meals meet the national school food nutrition standards,
  • We teach cookery and baking,
  • We host a cooking club,
  • We provide drinking water for free,
  • We have physical activities before and after school almost every day,
  • We have signed up to the PE Pledge to offer two hours per week PE,
  • We take longer swimming lessons than required,
  • We offer MAST access through school drop-ins,
  • We target some of our physical activities to less-engaged pupils,
  • We have introduced the Daily Mile sustainably,
  • Our PE Premium report shows how we are improving ‘outcomes’ through tr=argeted spending,
  • We have removed our Snack Shop,
  • We do not use sweets as rewards,
  • School meals provide for many dietary needs and are fully allergen-compliant,
  • School meals offer a salad bar every day, additionally and free.

I will not institute a rule that limits all snacks to a maximum of 100 calories – simply for the practical reasons of unenforceability.

We will not be searching lunch boxes, or turning out coat pockets, and confiscating snacks with ‘too much sugar’.

But with what appears to be direct links between snacking, unnecessary calories, food waste and obesity, we surely should be doing something effective.

An absolute ban would be the simplest thing to invoke, if it got full support and backing from parents and pupils. I wouldn’t want to see snacks being snuck in and sneakily snaffled in secretive scenes; that promotes rule-breaking and sets us on the path of conflict.

Would you, then, support a total ban on playtime snacks?

As I like to do, I have set up the simplest SurveyMonkey questionnaire (other web-based survey engines do exist) to collect opinion. Should take about 60 seconds from clicking this link:

https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/K53WMQJ

 

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14 Nov 2017

Love Food, Hate Waste

Love food, hate waste

Boy, do I do both. I could do a full A to Z of food I love, asparagus to zucchini, apple pie to zatar (a mixed spice from Egypt).

But I detest waste – we just don’t do it in my house. An empty plate at the end of a meal is the norm, and we very rarely throw anything away. It is a waste of money, a sad waste of resource, and it does not sit well alongside support for feeding those in need in the community through supporting food banks. Three million meals were supplied by Britain’s Food Banks last year. How can we have some going without and others throwing away as they have too much?

At lunchtime on the last two school days I have been in the hall wiping tables, clearing plates, doing door duty, helping the odd individual child. Both days I have been troubled by the amount of waste – the volume that is thrown away despite being chosen by the children themselves. By 12:45 today the bin was (discretely) full.

I weighed it, using some bathroom scales. 23 kilogrammes of food was thrown away by 460 pupils.

If each meal weighs about 500g (see First Steps Nutrition Guide 2013), that was 46 complete meals thrown away, or 10% of children taking a meal and throwing the whole lot in the bin.

It wasn’t lack of choice leading to food on a plate that children did not want – chicken curry and rice, Mexican bean tortillas, jacket potato with any of three fillings, and a choice from three desserts.

It wasn’t too much on a plate – no-one ever complains of that, and far too few take the vegetables or salad on offer to all.

It wasn’t quality –we are the second-most popular meal provider amongst Sheffield’s Primary Schools, and many staff regularly take the same school meal (and pay for it every time). Some children try to be last in and persuade the Cook to serve them extra if there’s ‘left-overs’.

It is not being rushed – no-one ever gets forced to rush or harassed if lunchtime is running out.

It is not to be with their friends – the children have full choice about where to sit and who to sit with.

It is not lumpy / cold / unusual / made off-site / ugly / off / ready-made / unknown / not as ordered.

I totally accept the NHS advice on portion sizes, that we should not force children to clear their plates, especially if, as research suggests, we tend to serve children with adult portions instead of the 75% portion-size appropriate for the age of the children we have in school.

 

But scary calculation time:

23 kg each day?

This becomes 4.37 tonnes or 8,740 meals of waste each school year!

 

I cannot accept that without challenging what is going on.

  • So should it be a campaign?
  • Smaller portions?
  • No play-time snacks?
  • Insisting on trying to eat more?
  • Acceptance?
  • Education and practising how to cut up baked potato skin?
  • Inviting parents in and enlisting their help?
  • Longer lunchtimes?
  • Different serving arrangements? (mains and dessert separately, perhaps)
  • More pandering?

It does raise some weird questions from observation:

  1. Why do the children run to the dinner queue if they are not so hungry that they want to eat all they are served?
  2. Why choose it and then throw it?
  3. How is it that on a Friday, when meal uptake is the highest in the week, we still get the same level of waste?
  4. How does any / so much get on the floor?
  5. What is the situation at home?
  6. Why do more than half our children take a school meal if, as it appears from the amount of waste, they dislike them?

So I’m asking School Council for their opinion. I’m asking Taylor Shaw what they think. I’m going to put up a display asking the dinner queue for input. I’m going to weigh and publish every day for a month. I’m going to stand by Rosie (ask the children) and see if I make any difference that way. I’ll ask the Cook and kitchen staff, and the midday supervisors. I’ll display some ‘Love Food, Hate Waste’ posters. I’ll ask the children directly why they are throwing away.

I suspect that I’m about to make myself highly unpopular with a campaign that challenges habits, choice, personal behaviour and something that might be considered selfish ignorance. Some people will think I’m telling them off. Some will think I should have better things to do. I’m doing it anyway.

 

Apple pie, bread, cheese, dates, eggplant, fried onions, green beans, hummus, ice cream, jam, kidney beans, limes, mince pies, Nice biscuits, olives, peanut butter, Quorn roast, roast parsnips,  sausages, toasted crumpets, upside-down cake, veggie pizza, watermelon, Xacuti, yogurt, zucchini, aubergine, broad beans, carrot cake, Dundee Cake, Éclair, French Fancy, Gateaux, Hot Cross Bun, Iced Bun, Jumble, Kuglehopf, Linzer torte, Madeira, Parkin, Queen’s Pudding, Rock Buns, Scone, Treacle Tart, …

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29 Jun 2017

A Weighty Issue

How many of our pupils do you think would be overweight or obese?

Do you think it would be so many that we might want to focus on it as an issue?

Recognising that we have reasonably affluent parents, the majority of whom have an active lifestyle themselves, an educated parent body, the majority of whom have ‘professional’ status in employment, the great outdoors on our doorstep and no end of sporting and active opportunities freely available locally and in the city, and parents who are willing to put in the effort needed to support their children’s involvement in regular clubs and groups, we might expect a low figure, certainly lower than national and city-wide averages.

Would 28.2% of our Year 6 pupils reported (National Child Measurement Programme outcome 2016) as overweight or obese surprise you?

That’s 33 children in each year group, or 132 across the whole school.

The list of sporting activities we put on or provide access to is pretty extensive. We promote many local clubs and other opportunities. We are signed up to the PE Pledge of 2 hours per week PE as a standard. Our school meals hit every nutritional standard. Your packed lunches are sound. We host a cooking club. We grow fruit and vegetables on site. Children are health-aware and conscious.

But we still show 28.2% as overweight or obese.

(A quick bit of balance – Sheffield city-wide average is 33.9% and the national average is 34.6%.)

Might we want to focus on this as an issue? It depends, doesn’t it, if we are content to be just better than average.

So here’s a heads-up on things we are already talking about:

  • •   The Daily Mile
  • •   Inclusive activities targeted at specific groups including Pupil Premium grant attracting pupils, out of catchment, non-engagement, sports averse, over-weight
  • •   Cutting out play time snacks
  • •   ‘Banning’ certain snacks from school,
  • •   ‘No cake, No sweets’ policies,
  • •   Weight management programs such as Alive and Kicking (http://www.whyweightsheffield.co.uk/children-and-young) and the school-based STOP,
  • •   Family information interventions such as ‘HENRY’ and ‘Start Well Sheffield’ (https://www.sheffield.gov.uk/education/information-for-parentscarers/care-support/childcare/start-well-sheffield.html)
  • •   Including cooking in the formal curriculum,
  • •   Fit Bit challenges,
  • •   Man v Fat Football (https://www.manvfatfootball.org/Home/Registration),
  • •   Issuing Pedometers to count steps / movement during the school day.
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17 Oct 2015

Big Bags Are Not Beautiful!

 A Spanish study of over 1,400 schoolchildren in 2012 found that over half the children had backpacks exceeding 10% of their body weight. The study also found that those carrying the heaviest backpacks had a 50% higher risk of back pain than those carrying the lightest, and a 42% higher risk of diagnosed back problems. http://www.nhs.uk/news/2012/03march/Pages/rucksack-bags-back-pain-children.aspx

So why the heavy bags?


A completely unscientific survey of our school’s cloakrooms this week found each and every cloakroom had bags, coats and rucksacks on the floor, often being trodden on as children reached over to fetch their own things. In the same survey we found that up to 25% (actually 22.4%) of coat hooks were bent out of their original shape in the same cloakrooms. Though there were more than enough coat hooks for the number of coats, there were still coats on the floor.

Fire Service inspections, and basic health and safety common sense says that walk routes should be kept obstacle free, so these bags and coats have got to be put away properly.

So why the bags on the floor?

On inspection we found many bags slung from the coat hooks – and they are ‘coat hooks’, not ‘bag hooks’. Try a websearch for ‘bag hooks’ – you get lots of kitchen cupboard storage ideas for plastic carrier bags.

Yes, we do give some limited homework. Yes, we have lots of our children learning a musical instrument. Yes, some of our pupils may be staying one night at mum’s and the next at dad’s. But we keep PE kit at school in separate bags. And homework is a single sheet most often. We have water in our taps at school, and so the water bottle should weigh very little as they could refill when they arrive in the morning. We don’t issue our children with textbooks, so they don’t need carrying. None of our pupils bring a personal laptop or tablet PC to school, so that weight and bulk is not in the bag either. Certainly, near on 50% bring a packed lunch, but does that really need to be wrapped in foil, held in a lunchbox and then carried in a rucksack?

The mantra in the cloakroom is:

  • Zip your bag shut and place under the bench,

  • Hang up your coat,

  • Place your lunchbox on the bench.

Easy, neat, tidy and safe.

But the mantra has been around for a year, and still we tidy up after children or fume a little about it. I think many bags are much bigger than needs be. I think much stuff is carried that could be left at home (why bring a football when school provides playground equipment including footballs?). I think we (you and us) haven’t taught our children how to put things away ‘properly’. And why treble-pack a packed lunch (or why not have the school meal?).


Watch out for the arrival of ‘The Golden Broom’ trophy and award coming soon.

 

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